Author Topic: Lumion 8- A Game Changer??  (Read 13966 times)

2017-11-18, 06:58:48
Reply #30

Benny

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All valid points. If it is what it seems like, it really presents a formidable challenge for many of us. Renders that take 20 seconds instead of an hour, instant feedback on scenes and materials, and simple setup and transfer from something like Revit and Archicad. At a certain level of quality it is not a question of whether Lumion produces better results than Vray or Corona, it is whether it is good enough. How many of us can honestly say they can improve on the picture above of Paris?

From what I have seen I think it is more than the render equivalent of Sketchup, which although it undoubtedly has a strong following, probably never became the killer product many expected. Sketchup falls between categories, which sometimes can be a blessing but sometimes a curse for a product. It is not strong enough to compete with 3ds Max for a full-time visualizer, but at the same time not CAD and parametric enough to replace something like Archicad or Revit. Hence, where Sketchup has become a parallel track, products like Lumion aims to replace the step where the architect needs a solid render for presentation or review, i.e. a huge portion of the current architectural visualization market.

I know quite a few architects, and if a solutions is in any way messy they will stay away, but if there is a realistic opportunity to control renderings by themselves they will immediately take it.

2017-11-18, 11:23:20
Reply #31

romullus

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Now that makes much more sense. From previous posts i was getting impression that it is some black voodoo magic software with the quality of raytracer and the speed of rasterizer :] However, if it doesn't need all that hurdle with lighmaps baking, it really can be treated as game changer IMHO. And its pricetag can be easily justified, having in mind its target auditory.
I'm not Corona Team member! Everything i say, is my personal opinion only.
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2017-11-18, 19:51:28
Reply #32

melviso

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@Benny  Exactly. It offers the option of getting something good enough for presentation and marketing tbh.

@romullus  The price tag is quite high though. They might reduce it if sales are good and it gets used more. UE4 lightmaps though is quite a bottle neck especially coming from offline renderers.

I personally believe there isn't such a thing as a perfect or hyper realistic renderer. There are limitations but if you understand the fundamentals of how to create a good render, the end result would always be high quality and photorealistic regardless of what renderer is used. Of course, certain features a renderer has plays a good role in making the results happen. Sometimes, you can fake certain features like reflections, ao and the results come off looking nice as well.
« Last Edit: 2017-11-19, 00:39:31 by melviso »

2017-11-19, 09:31:07
Reply #33

melviso

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Timelapse with Lumion 8:

« Last Edit: 2017-11-19, 09:37:02 by melviso »

2018-11-14, 17:54:14
Reply #34

Benny

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@Benny  Exactly. It offers the option of getting something good enough for presentation and marketing tbh.

@romullus  The price tag is quite high though. They might reduce it if sales are good and it gets used more. UE4 lightmaps though is quite a bottle neck especially coming from offline renderers.

I personally believe there isn't such a thing as a perfect or hyper realistic renderer. There are limitations but if you understand the fundamentals of how to create a good render, the end result would always be high quality and photorealistic regardless of what renderer is used. Of course, certain features a renderer has plays a good role in making the results happen. Sometimes, you can fake certain features like reflections, ao and the results come off looking nice as well.

I'm occasionally following this guy who makes tutorials here (one oncer), and he is now moonlighting into a new version of Lumion. Besides that rain drop effect probably getting old very quick, one has to agree that this quality is beyond conceptual use. I would really like to know how long time this took to render, but my guess would be a lot quicker than I could do it.




2018-11-14, 22:37:56
Reply #35

jpjapers

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Is it not VXGI or voxel based GI? If you have a look at Unigine they use it but theres also a separate fork of unreal engine by Nvidia that has vxgi built in. Its amazing and blew my mind first time i saw it. You essentially generate a map per voxel of lightmaps but the voxel size is controllable so you can do like a general lightmap with large voxels and then say you have a table with props you can select the area around the table and increase voxel densite so you get higher res lightmaps for the 3d space. Its crazy how fast itll render the voxel maps on a good system and you get a walkable scene with gi in a matter of minutes.