Author Topic: Threadripper Builds  (Read 137209 times)

2019-07-08, 23:55:02
Reply #465

JoeVallard

  • Active Users
  • **
  • Posts: 114
    • View Profile
    • Joe Vallard
Also should mention the 2990wx is on sale at microcenter as well for $1499. $300 off.
https://www.microcenter.com/product/510650/ryzen-threadripper-2990wx-30-ghz-32-core-tr4-boxed-processor

If your okay with waiting for the 3950x, I don't see why you don't just wait for the new threadrippers?

2019-07-09, 00:54:09
Reply #466

Dalton Watts

  • Active Users
  • **
  • Posts: 136
    • View Profile
Does anyone want to buy my dual Xeon 2696 v3 workstation...? :)

I'm also waiting for the zen2 Threadrippers. Hopefully, single core performance will be on par with the 3900X (~205CB score) and multicore will be double that of my current dual Xeon workstation (4400CB). Like nkilar, I guess I'll wait till the end of the year instead of buying the 3900X or 3950X.

Generally speaking, do you guys think going from a 142 single core cinebench score (which is what I get on my dual Xeon workstation) to a 205 will be noticeable in overall 3ds max "snappiness"?

2019-07-09, 02:08:09
Reply #467

lupaz

  • Active Users
  • **
  • Posts: 386
    • View Profile
Also should mention the 2990wx is on sale at microcenter as well for $1499. $300 off.
https://www.microcenter.com/product/510650/ryzen-threadripper-2990wx-30-ghz-32-core-tr4-boxed-processor

If your okay with waiting for the 3950x, I don't see why you don't just wait for the new threadrippers?

Because I wouldn't spend over $1500 on just the CPU.
It's above my budget.

2019-07-09, 13:41:41
Reply #468

Jpjapers

  • Active Users
  • **
  • Posts: 1221
    • View Profile
Also should mention the 2990wx is on sale at microcenter as well for $1499. $300 off.
https://www.microcenter.com/product/510650/ryzen-threadripper-2990wx-30-ghz-32-core-tr4-boxed-processor

If your okay with waiting for the 3950x, I don't see why you don't just wait for the new threadrippers?

Because I wouldn't spend over $1500 on just the CPU.
It's above my budget.

Last i heard there wasnt any plans for new threadrippers??

2019-07-09, 14:44:56
Reply #469

nkilar

  • Active Users
  • **
  • Posts: 852
    • View Profile
    • My personal website
@Jpjapers Lisa Su was interviewed a while ago (after Computex but before New Horizons if I remember correctly) and she said that they have plans for the Threadripper line and its not depreciated.

My guess, and its only a guess, is that they'll probably wait for the wafers to start coming out in decent numbers and that the Epyc line gets priority treatment. Remember, they made quite a few big deals in the data center arena so its probably possible they prioritize that. If there is a planned Threadripper and its 64 core it will probably come out of the same dies as Epyc.

@Dalton Watts I don't know about 3ds Max but C4D is a bit more picky and I'm thinking the ~50ish point difference will show up. I do use 3ds Max here and there and I don't see much of an issue there with slower single threaded builds. For the viewport at least, I think 3ds Max prefers a better graphic card more but thats just the viewport. As long as you don't have those pesky threading issues heh... :)

@JoeVallard That's borderline crazy. So much value in existing products and yet the upgrades are supposedly also on the way... Fun times!!
« Last Edit: 2019-07-09, 14:58:08 by nkilar »

2019-07-09, 15:22:49
Reply #470

maru

  • Corona Team
  • Active Users
  • ****
  • Posts: 9270
  • Marcin
    • View Profile
Damn, looks like these new Ryzens destroyed many buying guides. For example, it seems buying a TR 1920x does not make much sense any more with Ryzen 3700x. That's 400 € vs 350 € with similar or even better performance, and it will get even cheaper.

2019-07-09, 15:40:48
Reply #471

JoeVallard

  • Active Users
  • **
  • Posts: 114
    • View Profile
    • Joe Vallard
Damn, looks like these new Ryzens destroyed many buying guides. For example, it seems buying a TR 1920x does not make much sense any more with Ryzen 3700x. That's 400 € vs 350 € with similar or even better performance, and it will get even cheaper.

I paid $479 total for my Mobo and 1920x which is slightly cheaper than the 3900x alone. But yeah the 3900x just kicks all of the non wx models in the teeth with only 12 cores! Maybe the 3950x will give the 2970wx a run for is money. Even if they didn't add more cores to zen 2 threadripper, it would seem like the IPC gains alone would significantly increase the performance with the 24/32 thread TRs!

2019-07-10, 23:28:25
Reply #472

Juraj Talcik

  • Moderator
  • Active Users
  • ***
  • Posts: 3763
  • Tinkering away
    • View Profile
    • studio website
That said, for 240hz gaming

I really weep for humanity sometimes...even reading about the 144Hz was making my head hurt, but all these 720p benchmarks to see if I CPU is handicapping games above insane FPS count..

The new Ryzens are crazy. And looks like you can ignore the X570 if you don't need their better VRMs (which come with expensive PCI 4.0 and lot of gaming gimmick so you end up with insanely priced mainstream board. I mean...600-1000 Euro for non-HEDT motheboard ? 1:1 MB/CPU cost parity ? Oh man..gamers really make everything worse).

Good observations though :- ).

And yup...the progress in CPUs is finally totally crazy. I also paid 6000+ Euros for my first dual-xeon build few years go (2x2680v2, non-ES real stuff) and it's sadly sitting shut off for almost year...with 2600 CB15 points, it's not even worth to use in farm. And I can't even be bothered to sell it for few bucks...the Case + Coolers (Define XL2 + 2xU14s) alone are worth more than that mobo + CPUs :- ). I need to hire some new people I guess..

But this is fantastic for everyone, no one should need to waste money to fill corporate pockets just so you can get the right gear. It's almost like when SGI bankrupted (metaphorically) overnight when PCs came to market. Our CGI progenitors used 80k machines to render bunch of polygons...we are using 6k+ workstations...and in future everyone will use 2-3k workstations. Or even fraction of that with cloud, who knows where that trend will stop.

Even if they didn't add more cores to zen 2 threadripper, it would seem like the IPC gains alone would significantly increase the performance with the 24/32 thread TRs!

Yeah, this alone would be really nice.
talcikdemovicova.com  Website and blog
be.net/jurajtalcik   Our studio Behance portfolio
Instagram   Our studio Instagram, managed by Veronika

2019-07-11, 20:03:50
Reply #473

engiu

  • Active Users
  • **
  • Posts: 20
    • View Profile
Hi guys, I spent some time testing my new workstation. I come from an HP Z820 dual Xeon E5 2643, and the new one clearly outperforms it. For the same render now I spend 1/5 of the time.
In idle the CPU temperatures is between 31°C and 33°C, under heavy load up to 53°C in the worst scenario.
I noticed that sometimes, during a render, after staying stable at 52°C for several minutes, the temperature goes for less than a second to 62°C and than it goes back to 52°C while the CPU load seems to go down instead. Why? Is it normal?
Another thing that I saw is that if in 1 hour render the temperatures doesn't go above the 52°C, during denoising it can go up to 58°C for example, why does it happen? It seems that some tasks are heating more than others under the same CPU usage.

Thanks,
Andrea

2019-07-11, 20:19:56
Reply #474

TomG

  • Corona Team
  • Active Users
  • ****
  • Posts: 2744
    • View Profile
In some tasks, the CPU doesn't know for sure what data it will need to fetch from memory next, resulting in a microsecond delay that lets it cool down while that data is fetched once it does know what it needs. In a task like denoising, everything is known as to what comes next, so it can all be prefetched and the CPU never pauses, even for microseconds, so it's temperature goes up as it really is working flat out :)

2019-07-11, 20:21:42
Reply #475

TomG

  • Corona Team
  • Active Users
  • ****
  • Posts: 2744
    • View Profile

2019-07-11, 21:19:35
Reply #476

Juraj Talcik

  • Moderator
  • Active Users
  • ***
  • Posts: 3763
  • Tinkering away
    • View Profile
    • studio website
Hi guys, I spent some time testing my new workstation. I come from an HP Z820 dual Xeon E5 2643, and the new one clearly outperforms it. For the same render now I spend 1/5 of the time.
In idle the CPU temperatures is between 31°C and 33°C, under heavy load up to 53°C in the worst scenario.
I noticed that sometimes, during a render, after staying stable at 52°C for several minutes, the temperature goes for less than a second to 62°C and than it goes back to 52°C while the CPU load seems to go down instead. Why? Is it normal?
Another thing that I saw is that if in 1 hour render the temperatures doesn't go above the 52°C, during denoising it can go up to 58°C for example, why does it happen? It seems that some tasks are heating more than others under the same CPU usage.

Thanks,
Andrea

Denoising seems to utilizing everything to full, I've also noted almost 10C Delta over regular rendering.

This could be a good benchmark, render 8k image with few passes, only for like 30 seconds and then start denoising. It will denoise for 10 minutes and that's a good stability test, maybe even better than Prime95.

(General note, as some people here write the temps with offset and some true, everyone should write from HWiNFO64)
talcikdemovicova.com  Website and blog
be.net/jurajtalcik   Our studio Behance portfolio
Instagram   Our studio Instagram, managed by Veronika

2019-07-16, 00:00:56
Reply #477

Njen

  • Active Users
  • **
  • Posts: 506
    • View Profile
    • Kickstart Cyan Eyed!
It's almost like when SGI bankrupted (metaphorically) overnight when PCs came to market. Our CGI progenitors used 80k machines to render bunch of polygons...we are using 6k+ workstations...

SGI's didn't go bankrupt specifically because PC's came on to the market, Windows NT was around for a while, and nothing really changed. But then one day with a well thought out plan by Microsoft, they bought Softimage to specifically port it to Windows NT, with the hopes that everyone else would not want to miss out on the action, and it worked, as soon after everyone else started porting to NT. To top it all off, once Microsoft were satisfied that they had gotten enough of the new emerging CG market to sustain itself, they then sold Softimage, and even made a profit on the sale.
Please support my Kickstarter for my animated film, Cyan Eyed (rendered in Corona)!

2019-07-16, 10:43:42
Reply #478

Juraj Talcik

  • Moderator
  • Active Users
  • ***
  • Posts: 3763
  • Tinkering away
    • View Profile
    • studio website
It's almost like when SGI bankrupted (metaphorically) overnight when PCs came to market. Our CGI progenitors used 80k machines to render bunch of polygons...we are using 6k+ workstations...

SGI's didn't go bankrupt specifically because PC's came on to the market, Windows NT was around for a while, and nothing really changed. But then one day with a well thought out plan by Microsoft, they bought Softimage to specifically port it to Windows NT, with the hopes that everyone else would not want to miss out on the action, and it worked, as soon after everyone else started porting to NT. To top it all off, once Microsoft were satisfied that they had gotten enough of the new emerging CG market to sustain itself, they then sold Softimage, and even made a profit on the sale.

That's interesting and I've never even heard of Softimage in this tale :- ).

But even Wikipedia lists the main reason for decline to be hardware competition and their failed attempts at migration from MIPS/IRIS architecture to similarly expensive and soon to be obsolete Itanium.
Their main competition is listed on hardware level (Dell, HP, IBM) through that decision ( 2006 +/- ), even though software is mentioned to have played an obvious role, Maya is mentioned instead (as Alias/Wavefront).

Why would software be the defining factor if it worked on multiplatform at that point (1996) ? The cost of hardware would still be decisive factor in such situation ? (Regardless of particular software).
Now you could run Alias/Maya at 100k IRIS machine vs 10k x86 PC from Dell.

Even their final death was due to late adoption of Xeons in Super-server market where they were still competing with Itanium. They only lasted 3 years (2006-2009) between bankrupcy protection to final bankrupcy.
Seems to be like company that banked on wrong hardware decisions after their original technology became obsolete. Whatever role software played, it wasn't the primary one.

« Last Edit: 2019-07-16, 10:48:18 by Juraj Talcik »
talcikdemovicova.com  Website and blog
be.net/jurajtalcik   Our studio Behance portfolio
Instagram   Our studio Instagram, managed by Veronika

2019-07-17, 02:06:20
Reply #479

Njen

  • Active Users
  • **
  • Posts: 506
    • View Profile
    • Kickstart Cyan Eyed!
I was talking about specifically in the realm of CG graphics, before Softimage was ported to NT, there was not much on Windows, as the entire industry was at the time still on SGI's. I remember this because I was working in the industry at the time, and when the news of Softimage being ported to NT was reported, almost overnight, most of the major CG houses started to question the move to Windows. Software was very much the driving factor.

[Edit]
I found a post on a forum from 2005 by Jeremy Birn (one of the most prolific lighters from Pixar):
Quote
In the 1990’s, high end work based on commercial 3D software became centered around one pipeline: Model in Alias (that was Alias Studio/Alias Power Animator), Animate in Softimage (that was Softimage Creative Environment later called Softimage|3D), and render in Renderman. All of this was done on SGI workstations.

After Microsoft bought Softimage in 1994 and clearly was going to port Softimage to Windows NT, SGI aquired both Alias Research and its leading competitor Wavefront|TDI, and put them together basically to make a new program that would crush Softimage. It worked. Companies switched from modeling in Alias, then animating in Softimage, to doing both modeling and animation in Maya. Use of Softimage really plunged between 1995 when it was the industry standard animation program and 2000 when it was looking like a has-been and most companies had dumped it for Maya.

Of course, Microsoft’s port of Softimage to Windows NT was successful, and eventually Alias had to port Maya to Windows as well, even while it was owned by SGI. Softimage was sold to Avid, has slowly battled its way back with its own next-generation app, XSI, and is starting to gain market share in the high-end again.
« Last Edit: 2019-07-17, 02:41:50 by Njen »
Please support my Kickstarter for my animated film, Cyan Eyed (rendered in Corona)!