Author Topic: Corona C4D focal length  (Read 1481 times)

2019-05-24, 03:35:01

daveclive

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Hi all,

Using Corona V4 for C4D.
What focal length and sensor size is best to use for a small living room environment?

2019-05-25, 04:39:26
Reply #1

Pepelecrabb

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I'll chime in since nobody else is. The short answer is...it is entirely subjective. Plus you can do what ever you like (cheat) to get the look you're after. If you want it to look like images we are traditionally used to viewing then there are a couple hard and fast rules from the old film days.

When we used to shoot interiors on film the first rule is selecting your film size. This decision was based on the maximum reproduction size needed for the final image. We would shoot on the smallest film size we could because the smaller the film (now sensor) dimensions the greater the depth of field at a given fstop. Nowadays with digital sensors this is somewhat irrelevant. With CGI it is totally irrelevant.

Once the film(sensor) is established then that narrows down the choice of lenses. I'll speak in 35mm terms here but if you wish to go with 70mm then the lens focal length also needs to doubled (roughly). i.e to get a 24 mm lens on 35mm angle of view on a 70mm sensor you would need a 48mm lens (roughly).  So with that being said, a small room interior would be shot with a 20mm to 24mm lens. Sometimes a 28mm if at all possible depending on the scene. But here we would pick the longest lens possible to reduce distortion. Ive photographed interiors fromr outside through doors or windows or at the very least scrunched into the corner of a room to use the longest lens possible.

I think it was Richard Avadon who famously said "Photography is 10% inspiration, and 90% moving furniture."
God I love CGI.

2019-05-26, 03:39:06
Reply #2

Ealexander

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Good advice above.

Just keep in mind.... It's tempting to shoot a small space with a wide angle (15mm) lens, but you will get a massive  amount of distortion : vertical lines will splay out and things far left and right will get stretched out. The human eye is somewhere around a 50 or 55mm lens.

Clients ask all the time why we can't see the whole space in one shot on small sets and I ask them to photograph their bathroom with an iPhone and capture it all in one shot.... :)

2019-06-02, 19:19:24
Reply #3

vblackrender.

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What you can do is to hide the wall behind the camera and go backward with your camera am catch more from your scene without too much distortion. If there are no strong reflections where your hidden wall is visible, it can look very good. I do the trick very often in small rooms.

2019-06-07, 05:11:45
Reply #4

daveclive

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Thanks for the help and advice guys.
 Thought as much regarding hiding walls etc, just wanted to confirm was going about things the best way

2019-06-07, 09:34:20
Reply #5

romullus

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I would not recommend to hide walls, as it will unavoidably change lighting. Much better solution is to use camera clipping, or at least rayswitch, if clipping is not supported yet in C4D.
I'm not Corona Team member. Everything i say, is my personal opinion only.

2019-06-07, 10:18:49
Reply #6

nkilar

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I would not recommend to hide walls, as it will unavoidably change lighting. Much better solution is to use camera clipping, or at least rayswitch, if clipping is not supported yet in C4D.

Totally agree!

Oh and Camera Clipping is supported in C4D, just in case anyone is wondering ;)