Author Topic: Render warnings / crashes on high resolution scenes  (Read 2288 times)

2019-06-28, 11:55:35

EXM

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Hello, I have a problem with rendering scenes larger than the usual 1920x1080. See example below, a simple test scene with a square and a plane, rendered at 10240x5760 displayed an error message after 30 seconds (but was finally rendered). I can't render more complex scenes since it doesn't go through the first pass without crashing the whole system. Any clue?
(Running on a MacPro with 32 Go RAM and C4D R19 - I already tested rendering after rebooting, with only C4D running)
Thanks a lot for your inputs, cheers!

2019-06-28, 13:18:18
Reply #1

houska

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You seem to have a lot of memory used in total on the system. Which other applications do you have running? Does it help if you close them? Do you use multi-pass rendering? If so, how many passes do you use? At that resolution, the memory consumption can be quite huge... Could you show us what the Activity Monitor / Memory tab says if you click on Cinema 4D while rendering such a scene?

Thanks!

2019-07-09, 14:30:14
Reply #2

EXM

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Thanks for your answer! I closed every other app running, and disabled multi pass, but the error still happens - then I de-activated the few existing displacement maps and I was able to render at 7680x4320 without crashing (but with an instable system and many warnings). Is it a common case with Corona (or any other 3rd party renderers)? I was used to long (but stable) huge resolution renders with the native tools, and was surprised to see that the same big size scenes meant more chances to crash with Corona. This probably comes from my hardware, will dig into it.

2019-07-09, 15:06:51
Reply #3

hellyeah

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I`m running Corona on a MacPro with 48GB Ram. No problems so far when rendering images up to 8000 pixels. Why do you need that huge dimensions?

2019-07-09, 17:27:59
Reply #4

burnin

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Note:

If image is too large to fit, this (Tiled camera) technique still applies.

2019-07-11, 10:27:47
Reply #5

EXM

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@hellyeah -> I needed a huge render for printing purposes - my usual renders are not that big.
@burnin -> thanks a lot for this tip, it will help me a lot!!!

2019-07-11, 15:22:20
Reply #6

hellyeah

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Just wondered how large that printing would be. nearly 90cm @300dpi - that´s really large. Normally you don`t need a resolution that high for any printing purpose. Even for printings like megalights. Normally printers demand a very high resolution in the medie specs. If you talk to them they´re normally satisfied with a much lower resolution. And remember that renderings in general can be interpolated with very good results.
just my 2 cents ;-)

2019-07-11, 16:43:09
Reply #7

EXM

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You are more than right, this was way too much for a HD print - I just wanted to have the ability to crop my scene after the final render and choose what's best for a print without caring too much about the format. Next time I'll think about it BEFORE rendering, since I didn't expect my machine to slow down / crash like that :) Thanks for your reply!

2019-07-11, 17:28:43
Reply #8

hellyeah

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haha, I understand you very well. Same problems here often. Let´s make it a little bit bigger just to cover every possible change. First time rendered I don´t care (over night), then I´m beginning to doubt when my photoshop file hits some GB. And then I have to render it again because of some changes and the deadline comes closer and closer and I desperate :-)