Author Topic: Corona as a professional renderer for visualization?  (Read 13624 times)

2014-04-05, 19:13:08
Reply #15

hairston630

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I dont want to just assume that im going to jump right into it.

You will ;)

In rendering, absolutely!  In Arch-Viz, not a chance.  I am completely aware of the insurmountable talent in this field and that I have a snowball's chance in hell of making it to the level of say Peter Guthrie, but this is something I want to be in for the long haul.  I want to learn as much as I can and am in no rush to get to the destination.  The journey is everything.  Plus, I realize that the actual work itself is 20% of the work, while the 80% is business acumen.

2014-04-05, 19:18:06
Reply #16

hairston630

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In ArchViz you have some freedom, especially when it comes to workflows and the tools you use in your practice. In most cases Visualizers don't offer their  client the files that produce the renderings, mainly because of the complexities of the render setups plus the staging that we go through create them. Also, in most 3d visualizations, elements like materials, objects, backdrops, landscape and even lighting is proprietary of the artist who is creating it. So ArchViz is a democracy in that sense.

For a renderer choose wisely...choose a renderer with good support, widely distributed, and one that you rock on.

Thank you for those insights, Alex.  I am definitely enjoying Corona and its workflow; however, I realize that there is more training (of course) available for other production renderers.  I must say, I enjoy the results of Corona more so than I do Vray or MR.  It just seems to produce more realistic renders, although its negligible in contrast to vray. 

2014-04-05, 21:12:49
Reply #17

Juraj

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  Plus, I realize that the actual work itself is 20% of the work, while the 80% is business acumen.

You would be surprised, but I would say 90perc. of people in archviz and many predomintantly freelance oriented industries do not.

But you got the percentage correct :- ) So you're already on good way.
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2014-04-06, 00:49:51
Reply #18

Dervish

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In terms of arch vis, it all depends on what part of the production line you are in, meaning, either in the 2d or 3d team. 2d, to create the super quick images ( half a day - 1 day - few days and the amount of changes are super annoying ), and 3d you guessed it ( Time, maybe a day to months, regarding super realism or animation ).

However as visualisation is becoming easier, there is a merge of both requirements regarding the Artist to now be versed in both 2d and 3d. Only a few can do this.  If you work for an Arch firm, once again depending on its size and projects, you will be producing super fast imaging and probably no realism at all to images such as - Mir - Luxigon - Dbox - but even these are considered the end result of imaging - Final advertising imaging. So a project could go through 20 internal images over a period of a year to then be eligible for few final advertising shots, which is then given to the named companies.

If Freelancing, no one cares as long as you can show what you can produce, but even then as you mentioned, you need a business model, how are you going to beat all the other super good freelancers?. Considering, the new trend where companies are creating their own teams, as its probably half the price in terms of wages per staff.

I used to use vray and now switched to corona. The senior partners or architects do not care what I am using, all they care is whether what they envisaged is what they can show the client.

Better to learn both, and I still don't even know Max or Vray in and out, but the work is always produced.

2014-04-06, 04:05:15
Reply #19

hairston630

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Most excellent, Dervish.  After about a week of really digging into both renderers, I don't even know if I can make myself break away from Corona after getting it off the ground.  So it looks like ill be learning both!  Its just so much easier to be creative with it.  I can; however, say that, by studying Vray, its making Corona that much easier to manipulate (as one mentioned earlier in the thread).  That was another internal mulling which brought me to the topic of this thread (using concepts of other renderers to understand Corona).  It is also encouraging to hear that clients are less concerned with renderers (as freelancers).